News – August 18, 2021

 

(Beaver Dam) It’s opening day for the Dodge County Fair. The Badger State Tractor Pullers are slated for opening night tonight at 7pm and will include a number of pro stock tractors and some of the top-running diesel trucks in the country. Free family-friendly activities throughout the fairgrounds starting today include pig, duck and goat races; the Nick’s Kids Show; and the educational Wild World of Animals show. The admission price is $7 to get in before 12 noon and $10 after that. Season tickets are $35 dollars. Kids age nine and under are free. On the carnival midway today, wristbands are $25. More information is at www.dodgecountyfairgrounds.com.

(Beaver Dam) With the Dodge County Fair getting underway, the Sheriff’s Office is reminding attendees to stay safe while enjoying the activities. Sheriff Dale Schmidt says they will once again be giving away child ID’s. The cards are small enough to be stored inside a wallet or pocket and can be quickly presented to first responders and includes the child’s name, birthdate and any identifying information. The ID’s will be available at the sheriff’s office trailer which is located underneath the grandstand at the fairgrounds. Schmidt says visitors can wave down a deputy if you see them walking around to get an ID.

(Beaver Dam) Those wanting to honor their loved ones will have the opportunity to do so during the Dodge County Fair. Family members, friends, or organizations can sponsor a shade tree with a small donation which includes a small plaque to remember those they lost. More than 10 trees are planted annually at the fairgrounds in the spring and fall. New this year, picnic table sponsorships are available for $250, each including two decals with a personalized inscription. Orders can be placed at the fair office. More information can be found at DailyDodge.com.

The Juneau Fire Department was dispatched late last night to a house fire in Juneau.  At 10:07pm reports came in of flames coming through the roof of 328/330 S. Fairfield Avenue.  Upon arrival, a water supply was established and responders were able to quickly knockdown the fire.  All residents of the duplex were accounted for with no injuries reported.  Crews were able to clear the scene at 12:30am.  The cause of the fire is still under investigation.  Assisting on the scene were fire departments from Horicon, Hustisford, Clyman, and Beaver Dam, as well as the Juneau Police Department and Juneau EMS.

(Beaver Dam) There are now 17 wards in the city of Beaver Dam. The common council this week approved the annexation of 43 acres off South Center Road in the Town of Beaver Dam near the Apple Valley subdivision. The land will be used by the DPW for composting. Ward 17 is one of three wards in the city with no residents. It is anticipated that such wards would be absorbed into other wards containing actual city residents during annual redistricting which is currently underway.

(Columbus) There are several upcoming walk-in COVID vaccine clinics in Columbia County. Both the one-and-done Johnson and Johnson vaccine and the two-shot Pfizer vaccine will be offered at the Columbus Middle School at 400 South Dickason Boulevard between 4pm and 6pm Thursday. The second dose will be provided on Thursday, September 9th. A second vaccine clinic will be offered from 5pm to 7pm at Tarrant Park Shelter at 101 Tarrant Drive in Cambria next Wednesday. Information about scheduling a vaccine shot is available at DailyDodge.com.

(Dane County) Dane County’s health department is reinstituting the county wide indoor mask orders again, thanks to the resurgence of COVID. Madison Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway says they will not be putting occupancy limits in place for businesses and other public spaces. The order goes into effect on Thursday and runs through next month. – WRN

(Wisconsin) Wisconsin’s stimulus payments have been huge paydays for state and local governments. Governor Evers’ office says $1.5-billion-dollars of the $4.5-billion in stimulus money that’s gone to Wisconsin has gone to government operations, including local governments, state government, and the University of Wisconsin System. The biggest amount of money went to Wisconsin’s coronavirus testing program, but millions more went to government operations and so-called “surge funding.” – WRN