New York has the most COVID-19 cases of any other country

narvikk/iStock(NEW YORK) — New York, once the epicenter of the U.S. COVID-19 outbreak is now the epicenter of the globe, reporting over 160,000 confirmed cases — the most out of any other country in the world. 

Despite Governor Andrew Cuomo saying that the curve is flattening in the state, New York continues to see a record number of daily deaths.  While hospitalization rates down and ICU admissions now as low as rates seen on March 19, the death toll on Thursday rose by an additional 779 people.  

Overall, 7,067 New Yorkers have died, nearly triple the amount of souls lost during the terror attacks on September 11, 2001 — which was 2,753.

18,000 New Yorkers remain hospitalized due to the virus, which Governor Cuomo says is below expectations — a good thing.

“We are flattening the curve by what we’re doing,” Cuomo encouraged — referencing staying home, shuttering non-essential businesses and practicing social distancing.  “You can’t relax.”

Cuomo also cautioned the track of the 1918 Spanish Flu, reminding residents it hit in three waves.  “We ar only in the first wave [of COVID-19],” he cautioned.  “We can’t assume that because we are seeing some positive signs this will be over soon or that additional waves won’t hit. NYS will not underestimate this enemy.”

It also should be noted that Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, believes the first COVID-19 cases in New York City actually originated in Europe, not China.

In the U.S. alone, nearly half a billion people — 461,437 — have been diagnosed with COVID-19 and 16,478 have died.  Of those confirmed cases, 25,410 have fully recovered.

Worldwide, the number jumps to 1.59 million confirmed cases with 353,975 recoveries and 95,455 deaths.

While the U.S. has the most confirmed COVID-19 cases, Spain has eclipsed Italy’s amount, reporting 153,222 cases with over 52,000 recoveries and 15,447 deaths.

Italy, however, remains the country with the highest amount of deaths with 18,279 fatalities.

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