Coronavirus updates: US death toll surpasses 50,000

narvikk/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, WILLIAM MANSELL and ELLA TORRES, ABC News

(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 190,000 people worldwide.

Over 2.7 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations’ outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 869,000 diagnosed cases and at least 50,031 deaths.

Here’s how the news is developing Friday. All times Eastern:

11:56 a.m.: FDA warns against using hydroxychloroquine

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning the public not to use hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine to treat COVID-19 outside of a hospital setting or a clinical trial.

“Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine have not been shown to be safe and effective for treating or preventing COVID-19,” the FDA said in a statement on Friday. President Donald Trump had previously touted hydroxychloroquine as a possible treatment.

 The agency noted there have been reports of serious heart rhythm problems in patients with COVID-19 who were treated with either of the two FDA- approved drugs, which are used to treat or prevent malaria. The FDA also said it has reviewed case reports concerning serious heart-related adverse events and death in patients who received the drugs that were reported in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System database, the published medical literature, and the American Association of Poison Control Centers National Poison Data System.

“We are continuing to investigate these safety risks in patients with COVID-19 and will communicate publicly when more information is available,” the agency said.

11:30 a.m.: WHO announces effort to accelerate vaccines

Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the director general of the World Health Organization, announced that his agency was launching a new effort to accelerate the fight against the virus.

Tedros said in a briefing that the effort will bring together health groups and private sector partners to find a vaccine and ensure the public has access to it.

“This is a landmark collaboration to accelerate the development, production and equitable distribution of vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics for COVID-19,” the director general said.

The partnership for the ACT Accelerator includes the help of French President Emmanuel Macron, EU President Ursula von der Leyen and Bill and Melinda Gates.

“We are facing a common threat, which we can only defeat with a common approach,” Tedros said.

11:08 a.m.: US death toll surpasses 50K

The death toll in the United States has surpassed 50,000, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

There are now at least 50,031 deaths in the country, the data shows.

The grim milestone was reached Friday morning, five days after the number of fatalities hit 40,000.

The U.S. has the highest death toll in the world and the most number of cases.

10:46 a..m: Stay-at-home order extended in Michigan

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has extended the state’s stay-at-home order through May 15.

The order was previously set to end on April 30.

The new order will require people to wear homemade, non-medical face coverings when entering enclosed public spaces, such as grocery stores, according to a statement from Whitmer’s office. People will not face criminal penalties for going out without a mask, her office said.

Some restrictions will also be eased. Nurseries, landscaping and lawn-service companies can reopen, but social distancing must be maintained, according to Whitmer’s office. Retailers that do not sell necessary supplies will also be allowed to reopen for curbside pick-up and for delivery.

Motorized boating and golf will be allowed, but using golf carts is still prohibited. Individuals will also be allowed to travel between their residences, but her office noted that “such travel during the epidemic is strongly discouraged.”

“With new COVID-19 cases leveling off, however, we are lifting some of the restrictions put in place in the previous order,” Whitmer said. “I want to be crystal clear: the overarching message today is still the same. We must all do our part by staying home and staying safe as much as possible.”

10:31 a.m.: NYC mayor says all COVID metrics are down

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio on Friday offered what he called “just plain good news” on the virus’s spread in the city.

De Blasio said all indicators — hospitalizations, ICU admittances and percent of the population that tested positive — were all down.

Daily hospitalizations of people with suspected COVID-19 went down from 227 to 176, which the mayor called a “serious decline.” The number of people admitted to ICUs on a daily basis decreased from 796 to 786 and the citywide percentage of people who tested positive went from 32% to 30%.

De Blasio also spoke about the disproportionate ways the virus appears to affect communities of color. His Equity Action Plan includes active testing sites in those communities and advertisements that are broadcasted in 15 languages in 88 zip codes.

He said even after the pandemic ends, New Yorkers can never “look away” from these disparities.

10:03 a.m.: NY hydroxy trials deliver inconclusive results

Trials of a malaria drug that was touted by President Donald Trump for treating COVID-19 delivered inconclusive results in New York, according to the head of the research team.

There was not a “statistically significant difference” between patients who took hydroxychloroquine and those who did not, David Holtgrave, dean of the University at Albany School of Public Health, told ABC News.

During CNN’s coronavirus town hall on Thursday night, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo backed that up, saying the drug “was not seen as a positive, not seen as a negative.”

8:59 a.m.: South Korea reports no deaths, only six new cases

For the first time in a month, South Korea has reported no new deaths from COVID-19 in the last 24 hours, according to the Center for Disease Control (KCDC).

There were also only six new cases as of Friday, the KCDC reported. The total number of confirmed cases in South Korea is at least 10,708, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

7:16 a.m.: Lysol company says don’t ingest its products to fight coronavirus

Reckitt Benckiser, the company that makes Lysol, said you should not inject or ingest any of its products as a potential treatment for the coronavirus. This statement follows a press briefing Thursday in which President Donald Trump seemed to muse that UV light and disinfectants could maybe combat COVID-19.

“We must be clear that under no circumstance should our disinfectant products be administered into the human body (through injection, ingestion or any other route),” the company said in a statement.

RB, without specifically mentioning Trump or the press briefing, said it felt compelled to put out a statement because of “recent speculation and social media activity … whether internal administration of disinfectants may be appropriate for investigation or use as a treatment for coronavirus.”

“Then I see the disinfectant where it knocks it out in a minute, one minute,” Trump said during Thursday’s White House Coronavirus Task Force briefing. “And is there a way we can do something like that, by injection inside or almost a cleaning because you see it gets in the lungs and it does a tremendous number on the lungs so it would be interesting to check that.”

His comments came after a Department of Homeland Security official said their research found that ultraviolet rays and disinfectants like bleach and isopropyl alcohol work well against the virus.

6:15 a.m.: Georgia governor defends opening some nonessential businesses

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp defended his controversial plan to open some nonessential businesses on Friday, despite criticism from President Donald Trump.

Kemp said he’s followed federal safety guidelines and that now is the time to start reopening the state’s economy.

“Now, with favorable data and approval from state health officials, we are taking another measured step forward by opening shuttered businesses for limited operations,” Kemp tweeted Thursday night. “I know these hardworking Georgians will prioritize the safety of their employees and customers. Together, we will weather this storm and emerge stronger than ever.”

Trump said Kemp went too far in opening some of the state’s businesses.

“I want him to do what he thinks is right,” Trump said during a press briefing Wednesday. “But … I think (opening) spas and beauty salons and tattoo parlors and barbershops in Phase One … it’s just too soon.”

In addition, Kemp released new requirements through executive order, detailing how various businesses can begin reopening again starting on Friday and Monday. Some requirements include that restaurants must post signs saying no one with symptoms of COVID-19 can enter.

Georgia has at least 21,883 diagnosed cases of COVID-19, with at least 881 deaths.

3:30 a.m.: China reports no new COVID-19 deaths for ninth straight day

China reported no new deaths from the novel coronavirus for the ninth consecutive day on Friday.

There were also only six new cases of COVID-19, two of which were brought into the country from overseas, according to China’s National Health Commission.

Since the virus was first detected in the city of Wuhan back in December, the Chinese mainland has reported 82,804 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 4,632 deaths.

Hospitals were still treating 915 patients with confirmed cases as of Friday morning, including 57 who are listed in serious condition, according to the National Health Commission.

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