Dodge County Land Resources Department Urges Flood Insurance Evaluations

(Dodge County) Wisconsinites are being urged to evaluate their flood insurance coverage by public works departments across the state such as the Dodge County Land Resource and Parks Department.  This comes as the National Weather Service is predicting a temperature increase across Wisconsin in the coming week.  With the increase in temperature, and the levels of snow and ice still standing, the possibility of snowmelt-related flooding is increased.  The Federal Emergency Management Agency, known as FEMA, noted late last month that Wisconsin has a flood risk ranging from above normal to well-above normal for the months of March and April.

 

The Dodge County Land Resource and Parks Department is asking residents to help mitigate the effects of the rapidly melting ice and snow by clearing ice and snow from storm drains and grates around their property.  They warn that after the wet summer and fall the local area sustained, the ground could still be too saturated to handle the inches of water the rapid melting could cause.  An ounce of prevention now could save a pound of cure later, as homeowners are advised to remove snow from their roofs using a roof rake or push broom, ensuring venting around the home is not covered by snow, and that their sump pumps are working properly.  Clearing snow away from the home can also help prevent seepage of water through the foundation.

 

Wisconsin Insurance Commissioner Mark Afable says he thinks “it’s fair to say that most Wisconsinites are ready for winter to be over, but while were waiting for temperatures to rise, home and business owners should review their insurance policies to make sure they have appropriate coverage.”  He warns that when you purchase flood insurance, the policy often doesn’t go into effect for 30 days and considering your flood insurance now can be an important protection step.

 

More information about FEMA, the National Flood Insurance Program, and the risks of flooding can be found online at www.floodsmart.gov.